The theme that cuts across most of my blog posts from last year is creating and sustaining a learning culture in organizations.

As a way of review, I’ve selected five blog posts about a learning culture from 2015 that have the most 2016 interest for readers. Here is the title of each post with a short excerpt. Click on the title to go to the full post.

  1. Developing a Learning Culture Infographic This infographic explains briefly and concisely the need for a learning culture, barriers to a learning culture, actions of a learning culture, and results from a learning culture.
  2. Training Culture vs. Learning Culture What’s the difference between a “training culture” and a “learning culture”? The answer is, “A great deal.” As the chart shows, in a training culture, responsibility for employee learning resides with instructors and training managers. In that kind of culture the assumption is that trainers (under the direction of a CLO) drive learning. Whereas in a learning culture, responsibility for learning resides with each employee and each team.
  3. Pull, Don’t Push, Employee Learning As the digital revolution continues to fuel the faster rate of change, transforming all aspects of business, from supply chain management to communication, the highest-performing corporations are abandoning traditional “push” training for the “pull” learning model.
  4. PwC Canada Strives for a Learning Culture If you’re looking for examples of companies that are striving to create and sustain a learning culture, PwC (PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP) of Canada should be on your list. I recently had the pleasure of speaking about the importance of a learning culture to the Edmonton meeting of The Conference Board of Canada’s Council for Learning and Leadership Development. Another speaker at the event, Karin Muchall, Development Leader for PwC Canada, impressed me with her description of how PwC is implementing the principles of a learning culture through a program they call Enhanced Working PracticesTM.
  5. 50 Ways to Lever Learning In a learning culture, formal training is just one of many methods used to facilitate employee learning. In a learning culture, we start with the performance goal and then select the mix of methods that will help employees acquire and retain the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs they need in order to achieve those goals. This is a list of 50 of those methods.

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